MISSION: To increase and promote expertise in CBT.

How do you know that your skills are growing as a therapist? How do you know that you are practicing CBT with fidelity? These are the primary questions that Thrive CBT hopes to help you answer with clinical supervision.

CBT AS THE FOCUS

Clinical supervision will give you the perfect opportunity to learn and hone your CBT skills in a structured and ‘deliberate’ way. Whether you are new to CBT or use it regularly in your work, group supervision will give you the chance to practice, reflect and refine how you deliver CBT with your clients.

A lot of focus is placed on knowledge acquisition when it comes to providing therapy. Therapists attend courses, learn new strategies and start applying these techniques with their clients. However, the aspect of therapy that is often neglected is feedback on how competently these techniques are being implemented. Group supervision aims to address this.


“Success has to do with deliberate practice. Practice must be focused, determined, and in an environment where there’s feedback.”

-Malcolm Gladwell

BENEFITS OF SUPERVISION

  • Supervision improves therapeutic alliance ratings, treatment retention, symptomatic improvement and patient evaluations of treatment in randomized control trials (RCTs).
  • Therapists who receive supervision on a specific model of treatment, such as CBT, show better adherence to that model.

Cited from: Bambling et al Psychotherapy Research 16(3):317-331 2006

FORMAT

  • Clinical supervision will be provided in group format (face-to-face).
  • Each group will consist of a maximum of 4 participants.
  • Participants will sign up for two, 4-sessions blocks that run twice/year (i.e. Jan.-Apr. and Sept.-Dec.)
  • Group sessions will occur once/month and each session will be 2 hours in length.

ADDED BENEFITS OF GROUP SUPERVISION

  • Group supervision allows for the presentation of more diverse work samples and provides illustrations of CBT applied in different disorders.
  • Individuals are able to build skills via listening and modeling when the supervisor actively shares feedback with other trainees (vicarious learning).
  • Informally and formally evaluating the work of others promotes development of individual skills and future supervisory skills.
  • Additionally, role plays in dyads and triads can occur and broaden learning.
  • Group supervision is more cost effective than individual supervision.

Cited from: “Teaching and Supervising CBT” by Sudak, Codd, Ludgate, Sokol, Fox, Reiser & Milne (2016).

**INDIVIDUAL SUPERVISION IS ALSO AVAILABLE. PLEASE INQUIRE FOR MORE DETAILS.**

GETTING STARTED

Planning for these supervision groups is underway. If you are interested in participating or would like to know more information, please…

If you would like to know more about Jelani’s knowledge base, please visit his Professional Development page. This page contains the majority of trainings, workshops and courses that he has attended.

FOR CRPO MEMBERS: Jelani is not a member of the CRPO, but he qualifies as a clinical supervisor according to the CRPO standards.